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to prevent them? >> guest: how do we work to prevent those? we have technologies, cybertechnologies, prevention technologies. we spend a lot of time looking at detection technologies but again if we got the attack that would hurt our critical infrastructure to which the president referred resiliency and redundancy and response and recovery programs like we did with hurricane sandy. >> host: peter dumont as president ceo of air traffic controller association. mr. dumont your answer to that question? >> guest: there have been attacks on the system. they are not well publicized and they're not talked about because it's confidential information in office we don't want any people to know how the air traffic control system works. it's difficult to explain it on a soundbite. it's happened in alaska. what's being done now is we have very adjunct infrastructure for air traffic control. it's been around since the late 50's, early 60's antigenic so different equipment. right now we are in a modernization phase where we are modernizing the land-based air traffic control system to state-based sa
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
's because of years of federal support to develop hydrofracking technology. the eastern gas shales project was an initiative the federal government began back in 1976 before hydrofracking was a mature industry. the project set up and funded dozens of pilot demonstration projects with universities and private gas companies that tested drilling and fracturing methods. this investment by the federal government was instrumental in the development of the commercial extraction of natural gas from shale. in fact, microseismic imaging, a critical tool used in fracking, was originally developed by sandia national laboratory, a federal energy laboratory. the industry was also supported through tax breaks and subsidies. in fact, mitchell energy vice president dan stewart said in an interview that mitchell energy's first horizontal well was subsidized by the federal government. mr. mitchell said, and i quote -- "d.o.e., that's the department of energy, d.o.e. started it and other people took the ball and ran with it. you cannot diminish d.o.e.'s involvement." so the basis of the natural gas revolution
. our efforts mandate investments in the people, processes, and technology, not just technology, people, processes, and technology. completed training to improve the quality and productivity of claims. more are being trained, and for the new employees at complete more claims per day in their predecessors. use of visibility benefits and questionnaires. online forms for submitting medical evidence has dropped average processing time as a medical exams and improved accuracy. there are now three lines for processing claims, an express line for those that will predictably take less time, a special operations lane for unusual cases or those requiring special handling, and a core lane with roughly 60 percent of the claims, and that is the remainder. technology is critical, and in the backlog. our paperless processing system, veterans benefits management system will be faster and improve access, live automation, and reduce aryans. thirty regional offices now use this. of 56 will have it by the end of this year. homelessness, the last of our three particles, to end veterans homelessness in 2015.
, but if you think about the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing was atten the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you've generated so many questions, wow, i mean, i think -- i don't know if we keep track of a record and for handling them so well. i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] the scri
across the technology sector, we are increasing and grappling with a significant economic challenge. we are not able to fill all of the jobs that we are creating. the numbers help tell the story. at a time when unemployment nationally hovered just below 8% the unemployment rate in the computer and mathematical occupation is falling to just over 3%. in many states and many subcategories it has fallen below 2%. unfortunately this situation is likely to get worse rather than better. the bureau of labor statistics has estimated that this year the economy is going to create over 120,000 jobs, new jobs that will require a bachelor's degree in computer science. yet we estimate that all of the colleges and universities in the country put together will produce this year only 51,487 of these degrees. that is why this is of such great importance -- importance. you are considering important things, the green card shortage. it eliminates were goes very far to reduce the backlog. it eliminates the cap and creates a new green card category for advanced science technology in hearing and matt degrees, a
that will make it more appealing to our readers. >> guest: was helpful as that the technology, take a smart phone or a tablet and you literally wavered over the code in the book and you get a video of the atkins case of many of the other cases we've covered. >> guest: one o of the cases recovered and fought with you can at the death penalty for juveniles. somebody who is under 18. this case involved a 17 year old who seem to be on a -- took an elderly woman out on a bridge, pushed her off. she drowned her and they pick him up at his high school the next day, and within hours he had a cheerful confession to police. and we describe is in the book but when you put the phone over the code, you can see the confession yourself. >> host: i thought the codes were neat way to just kind of come in almost takes the reader to even more into the book. and i was wondering what was the thought behind that? is this the direction in which books are going to be headed, especially nonfiction? it does create a great opportunity to just really grab your readers. >> guest: martin will explain this. i didn't understand
investment in renewable and energy. give the benefit of the technology got when they were young industry. >> is it the anticipation in the next ten or fifteen years that all of the renewables will be able to catch up in surpass what is currently with oil, gas, and coal. >> over time. >> i have no problem with wind and hydroelectricity and solar. the assumption that we're going take away normal business expense from oil and gas and coal which will slow down the reduction and increase price. the same as the cigarette tax currently in the budget actually said we want to decrease usage by increasing the price. we get rid of revenue. it seems to be the same with oil, gas, and coal. we increase the price at the pump or home heating oil or electricity increase the price of those and try to supplement off to other areas which every economist i've seen deals with energy economy said those technologies probably not for thirty years or more to get close it catching up. 9 percent of the portfolio we supplement the other 1eu89%. >> i don't think the proposal on oil and gas industry work. i would be h
technology thesis expanding those. i tried to pacify unanimous consent and schumer came up and said no but how about passing mine by unanimous consent and i was actually quiet. they would have been shocked by that but they would have gotten something done. it would have been great fun to see we passed immigration reform by unanimous consent. >> i have to ask you about grover cleveland. >> if i was allowed to go back to when i wasn't alive, he seemed to be opposed to special interests and the also seem to be -- veto a bunch of bills and i think he it was a time period and i think some would call him a populist. part of me feels that way. >> we can probably get into more. alex and doyle. >> you're raising money for the national association of gun rights and he reported last week this came up for conversation and the steering committee. susan collins was pretty upset about that because the national session is gun rights is running ads and she is afraid it could cost party your seat. are you going to not do that in the future or change your course of action and will you be jeopardizing
the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing that we had to do first was to bring it to the attention of the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. of but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th, patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher, "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you have generated so many questions, wow. i mean, i ity -- i don't know if we keep track of a record -- i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] t
to remain independent as long as possible but if what they get is a significant amount of technology that is in a restrictive setting that may be contrary to their goal to have that discussion so that aligned the second is around transparency you mentioned it very nicely around because everyone is clear on what that cost is. the consumer and health care professionals it is common to have discussions with the primary care physicians in our network who ordered medication setter on the formulary that had no idea how much that drug costs before the wrote the prescription than the patient came back and complains. the transparency around that is important and the methodology and payment mechanism with the desired outcome not just the process >> with respect to comparisons internationally there is great diversity around the world but also cross-country's but there is one uniform rule that in systems that rely on a price setting system to keep their costs under control, the effectiveness it is very predictable -- predictable it is a flight control and reduces the supply of very expensive car
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
technology reporter for cq roll call with the update on the internet bill. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> further debate on the internet sales tax bill happening this afternoon when the senate returns from recess at 2:15 eastern. live coverage here on c-span 2. we have a facebook question on the internet sales tax. internet sales tax support or oppose and why? dozens are weighing in. sheri says i support taxing internet sales although i hate paying tax on anything. if we must be taxed on whatever we buy regularly why wouldn't the same hold true with internet sales. jerry writes, he opposes it. a big indication it's a bad idea both amazon and wal-mart support it. why would you think that would be? taxes and regulations favor big retailers because they can cover the higher overhead where smaller businesses typically can not. and rich says, a state should not be allowed to tax people they do not represent. sound familiar? you can offer your comments at facebook.com/cspan. we might use some of your remarks on the air. live now, to the inside of the white house briefing r
and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by unanimous consent. than schumer came up and said no, but i will pass, how about passing mind by unanimous consent? i was quite. i would've let this go by unanimous consent. they would have been shocked. i think it would've been great fun to see that all of the week as part of immigration reform just by unanimous consent. >> jerry? >> i have a couple of them. i had ask you why you think so highly of our late mayor, grover cleveland? >> f. i was allowed to go back when i wasn't alive, he seemed to be opposed to special interests. he also seemed to veto a bunch of bills, and i think that, you know, it was a time period, and i think some would call him a populist and i think that part of me feels that way. >> alex and then bolton. >> it was reported you were raising money for the national association for gun rights and it was just reported that last week this came up for conversation in the steering committee luncheon. susan collins was pretty upset about that because national association of gun rights is running ads in her state. she i
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16